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Copyright 2012 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Hoofcare Tips for Fall & Winter

By Susan Thomas , Montana Farrier Supply

 

November 2012 issue  

 

      When fall rolls around, some people pull their horses’ shoes, trim their hooves, and don’t ride their stock again until the following spring.

      Other people enjoy competing throughout the winter in indoor events such as barrel racing or team roping series, or just riding in an indoor arena.

      And then there are the people who use their horses in snowy and icy conditions — for work or play!

      Here are a few tips to consider about your horses’ hoofcare:

 

1      Your horse can go barefoot until spring; however, don’t neglect trimming his feet during the winter!

        Your farrier would love to trim your horse’s feet a few times during the winter, especially if you have a place out of the wind and snow! This will not only help out your horse as his feet will be in better shape for shoes in the spring, but it also helps out your farrier with added income during slow months.

 

2      If you are riding your horse outside and decide to shoe him, it’s best to use some sort of traction on the shoes, such as borium or drive-in studs, plus a snow rim pad or full pad.

        The borium or drive-in studs will prevent the horse from slipping, and the snow pad prevents snow from balling up and sticking to the inside rim of the shoe.

        It is like equipping your horse with 4 wheel drive!

 

3      There are many options for traction. If you just need a little something to get your horse from the barn to the arena or horse trailer there are some drive-in studs that almost sit flush with the surface of the shoe. They offer traction but they are not as aggressive as studs that sit up higher.

 

A studded shoe over a polyurethane pad that keeps snow from balling up.

 

4      Whatever you do, get outside, brush your horse, clean out his feet as often as you can. He’ll love seeing you and there is nothing better than a crispy, cold, snowy winter day!

 

For more information about hoof care and shoeing products, contact Susan at Montana Farrier Supply in Livingston, MT. Phone them at 406-222-1155 or visit www.montanafarriersupply.com.

  

Copyright 2012 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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