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Copyright 2012 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

The European Union’s Concern about 

U.S. Horse Meat

 

November 2012 issue  

 

      The news on Friday, October 12, 2012, was that the European Union was rejecting horse meat from the United States because of concerns of residual amounts of drugs like phenylbutazone (a carcinogen) and clenbuterol (a steroid). Since there are no equine slaughter plants in the U.S. , the ban was imposed on slaughter plants in Canada and Mexico which process horse meat.

     The International Equine Business Association, headed by Sue Wallis of Wyoming , was quickly on the case, sending an email the following day. She stated that U.S. horses processed in E.U.-approved plants were approximately 2,500 horses per week in Mexico , and 1,300 head in Canada . The number is higher than usual due to the drought.

     On Monday, October 15, we received a second email from Sue Wallis stating that the ban had been lifted.

     By July 2013, the European Union will require that each horse slaughtered for human consumption will need to have documentation, called a “passport” in Europe , certifying that the horse has been drug free for six months. In the U.S. , the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service is still finalizing a drug residue testing program. At this time, the US does not have an inspection system that has been approved by the EU.

     Whether or not the E.U. will enforce their requirement next July for documentation proving horses have not had drugs for 180 days is unknown.

  

Copyright 2012 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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