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Copyright 2011 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Equine Infectious Anemia

Confirmed in a Montana Mule

 

October 2011 issue

  

      As we were going to press for the October 2011 issue, we received word from the Montana Department of Livestock that “a 32-year-old mule in Carbon County had been diagnosed with equine infectious anemia (EIA).

         “Also known as ‘swamp fever,’ EIA is a potentially fatal viral disease of equines spread by biting insects. No vaccine or treatment is available for the disease, which is characterized by fever, depression, progressive weakness, weight loss, edema (fluid under the skin or in body cavities) and anemia.

      “The infected mule was discovered when a Coggins test — a screening test required for equine movement into or out of the state — was performed for out-of-state movement. The test was positive, and was confirmed by the USDA-APHIS National Veterinary Service Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames , Iowa .

      “Follow-up testing on two other equines located at the premises, which is currently under quarantine, is underway. The premises is located in a remote area with limited potential for exposure to other equines.

      “Due to strict regulations, owners of EIA-infected equines have few options. Those options include a lifetime quarantine with a minimum of 200 yards distance between the quarantined animal and other equines, euthanasia, and donating the animal for EIA-related research.

      “For additional information about EIA or testing requirements, please contact MDOL’s Animal Health Division at 406-444-2043.” Additional information is also available at:

www.aphis.usda.gov.

 

 

Current status of history of EIA in the Northern Rockies :

Dr. Jim Logan, DVM, Wyoming State Veterinarian —”We haven’t had any EIA cases recently. It’s fairly normal for us to get about one case a year; sometimes two or three, which is probably due to no active surveillance.”

Dr. Bill Barton, DVM, Idaho State Veterinarian — “We haven’t had any cases in three years. We do a lot of testing of animals crossing borders. I guess we’ve been fortunate.”

Dr. Martin Zaluski, DVM, Montana State Veterinarian, was unavailable for comment. Steve Merritt, Montana Information Officer, said: “We have had 169 cases [of EIA] since 1979, but that has decreased dramatically over the years. We had one case in 2007, and one in 2010.”

 

Copyright 2011 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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