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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine • Since 1993
Idaho • Montana • Nevada • Oregon • Utah • Washington • Wyoming

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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine
Distributed throughout the Greater Rockies Since 1993

 

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Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Wyoming Horsepeople Consider an 

Equine Health Passport

By Dorinda Troutman, RMR Staff Writer

 

November 2010 Issue  

     Horsepeople in Wyoming , including directors of the Wyoming Horse Council and the Wyoming State Veterinarian, are considering an Equine Health Passport that would allow horses to travel between Wyoming , Montana , and Idaho .

     Dr. Jim Logan, Wyoming State Veterinarian explains that, “The Wyoming Horse Council expressed interest in an Equine Passport, but the Wyoming Board of Livestock is not very interested. The Horse Council needs to make a strong recommendation in order for the Livestock Board to take it seriously.”

     Currently, a passport agreement already exists between the states of Idaho , Montana , Washington , Oregon , Nevada and California . Six Southern U.S. states have their own agreement, as well.

     Logan has been making conference calls to state veterinarians in the Northwest U.S. that have had equine passports in place since 1998, both to explore having a passport agreement between those states and Wyoming, and to find out how their passports are working out.

 

     Basically, an Equine Health Passport (also called a Six-Month Horse/Equine Permit/Certificate; or Extended Validity CVI) is a special equine health certificate that allows unlimited travel between agreeing states for up to six months (instead of the usual 30 days).

     For horse owners who travel frequently for business or for recreation, this could save time and expense.

     Logan explains that a horse can currently travel through Wyoming to participating states on a passport, but cannot stay in Wyoming . An agreement of participation between Wyoming and other states would change that.

 

     Included with the passport are an accurate drawing (or, in some States, photographs) of all markings and brands, a permanent or annual brand inspection and negative Coggins test results. The owner’s contact information and home (stabling) address of the horse must also be provided and a travel permit number must be obtained from the state(s) that would be entered.

     The issuing veterinarian must indicate which states the owner plans to travel to on the passport and the state veterinarian’s office sends a copy to each state marked. After the passport expires, the horse owner must send a log of his travels to states marked (a list of addresses is included on the passport).

     When asked if this complicated system is working in the Northwest states already using the passport, Logan says, “There is little compliance” (with owner’s sending in their paperwork after the passport has expired), even though “quite a few horse owners use it in the Northwest Region.”

     Logan believes that the Equine Passport already in place in a group of southern U.S. states is fairly well-used and appreciated.

 

     Dr. Dick Richardson, DVM, of Missoula , MT , tells RMR that the existing passport between Montana , Idaho , Washington , Oregon , Nevada and California works well for his clients who travel extensively with their horses.

     He says, “If Wyoming, Utah and Arizona would jump on board, it would solve a lot of regional travel problems.”

    

     For more information on the Six-Month Horse Permit/Equine Passport used in the Northwest:

Montana http://liv.mt.gov/liv/ah/import/horse_passport.asp.

Idaho http://www.agri.idaho.gov/Categories/Animals/importExport/importequine.php

Oregon http://egov.oregon.gov/ODA/AHID/animal_health/import_equine.shtml

Washington http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=16-54-071

 

Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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