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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine • Since 1993
Idaho • Montana • Nevada • Oregon • Utah • Washington • Wyoming

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1595 N First St

Hamilton, MT 59840

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Hamilton MT 59840

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info@rockymountainrider.com

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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine
Distributed throughout the Greater Rockies Since 1993

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Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Stable Smarts

Excerpts of Sensible Tips from the book

by Heather Smith Thomas, Salmon, ID

 

September 2010 Issue

 

     Fall is a good time to get your stock water ready for winter!

 

Freeze-proofing Water Pipes

     In a cold climate, heat tape can help keep above-ground water pipes from freezing. Be sure to buy the kind intended for water pipes. Plug the heat tape into a grounded, three-prong outlet protected by a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI), so that a short won’t start a fire or cause an electrical shock. Depending on the brand you buy, either run the tape along the underside of the pipe or wrap it around the pipe, then secure it with electrical tape or cable application tape. Be sure to locate the heat tape’s thermostat at the coolest end of the pipe.

     Following the manufacturer’s directions, use insulation to cover the pipe and all of the fittings and joints, as well as the heat tape’s thermostat (so it will register actual temperature around the pipe instead of the outside air temperature).

     Several types of insulation can be used, including polyethylene (a black tube 3 to 6 feet long, split lengthwise), fiberglass that comes in a bandagelike roll, and foam. Don’t put it on any thicker than recommended or the heat tape may become too hot.

 

Heat Tape on Plastic Pipes

     When using heat tape on plastic water pipes, first wrap the pipe with aluminum foil to help distribute the heat more evenly. Never put heat tape on a plastic pipe or a water hose that doesn’t contain water; the pipe or hose might become too hot and melt.

 

Heather Smith Thomas is the author of numerous articles and 20 books. She and her husband ranch near Salmon, Idaho . For more information about her books, visit www.rockymountainrider.com/Business_Profiles/heather_smith_thomas.htm.

Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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Rocky Mountain Rider Magazine • Montana Owned & Operated 
PO Box 995 • Hamilton, MT 59840 • 888-747-1000  •  406-363-4085 • info@rockymountainrider.com