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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine • Since 1993
Idaho • Montana • Nevada • Oregon • Utah • Washington • Wyoming

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1595 N First St

Hamilton, MT 59840

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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine
Distributed throughout the Greater Rockies Since 1993

 

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Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Sky Range Ranch Report

Real News from an Idaho Ranch

By Heather Smith Thomas, Salmon, ID

 

August 2010 Issue  

      We had a bad thunderstorm a couple weeks ago, with a lot of rain (and snow on the mountains), and wind, and it resulted in a wild car wreck at our son Michael’s place, up the creek a couple miles from us.

     Two of their cowdogs had crawled into one of their vehicles, an old Explorer they use for driving from ranch to ranch on their various leased places to irrigate or take care of cattle. The dogs wanted to get out of the storm and were able to get into the car because one of the windows doesn’t roll clear up.

     They must have cowered down under the dashboard to hide from the lightning and thunder, and probably laid on the clutch, since the vehicle was in gear and shouldn’t have been able to roll.

     The wind got it rolling; it left the parking area and rolled down off the hill, where it hit a big rock and turned sideways—taking the rock with it. It then rolled over a few times and over the steep embankment down to the county road, where it landed on its top. It was completely caved it in and the vehicle was totaled.

     The dogs survived their wild excursion with just some bumps and bruises, since they were small enough to be protected by the seats when the top smashed down.

     A full box of horseshoe nails (and some horseshoes) were in that vehicle, and those were scattered all through it—must have been a shower of sharp missiles as the car rolled over and over—and thudding horseshoes.

 

     This seems to be a bad-luck time for vehicles. Last Tuesday, we got a frantic phone call from Michael’s wife, Carolyn, asking my husband Lynn to bring his big tractor and a log chain up to their place.

     Our grandson Nick had lost his pickup in the neighbor’s pond. He’d just headed off to track practice, parked the pickup in the driveway to get out and shut the gate, since they are grazing two of their old horses in the several acres around their house and have to keep the gate shut. But the parking brake didn’t hold!

     While he was shutting the gate, the pickup rolled down the driveway, across the county road, through the fence, and into the neighbor’s pond, where it was sinking out of sight.

     Nick took Michael and Carolyn’s car to town for track practice. Lynn roared up there with our tractor, and found the whole front end clear under water. He and Carolyn were able to hook onto the back bumper of the pickup and pull it out.

     The dunking probably ruined the motor. It has moss on top of it and is still full of water. They hope to be able to put the motor from the wrecked Explorer (that the dogs drove over the cliff) in Nick’s pickup.

     Meanwhile we are loaning him our 35-year-old Chrysler that we haven’t driven for several years. It just needed a new battery and an oil change…

 

     Heather Smith Thomas is the author of numerous articles and 20 books. She and her husband ranch near Salmon, Idaho . For more information about her books, visit www.rockymountainrider.com/Business_Profiles/heather_smith_thomas.htm.

 

Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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PO Box 995 • Hamilton, MT 59840 • 888-747-1000  •  406-363-4085 • info@rockymountainrider.com