Click on Cover to View the Digital Edition

Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine • Since 1993
Idaho • Montana • Nevada • Oregon • Utah • Washington • Wyoming

Physical Address:

1595 N First St

Hamilton, MT 59840

Mailing Address:

PO Box 995

Hamilton MT 59840

Toll Free: 888-747-1000

Local: 406-363-4085

info@rockymountainrider.com

   HOME         ARTICLES         CALENDAR         MARKETPLACE         EXTRA NEWS         COMPANY INFO         ADVERTISE         CONTACT US

 

Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine
Distributed throughout the Greater Rockies Since 1993

 

HOME

Articles

Current Issue

Archives

Past Covers

Photo Albums

Calendar

Calendar of Events

CLASSIFIEDS

Classified Ads

MARKETPLACE

Advertiser Links

Stallion Profiles

Business Profiles

Horse Sale Profiles

Western Mercantile

ABOUT US

Contact Us

History

Green Information

Made in USA

Editorial Guidelines

Subscribe

ADVERTISE

Ad Rates

Distribution area

Camera Ready Req.

CLUB CONNECTION

Club Directory

Calendar

Competition Results

Extra News Section  

EXTRAS

Extra News Section

Health & Emergency Alerts

Horsepeople's Forum

 

 

Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Dog Hair & Mule Sweat

with Natalie Riehl

editor@rockymountainrider.com

 

May 2010 Issue

 

     Every now and then I am a sucker for a gadget I see advertised on TV. In 1990, I just had to buy some windshield wipers which — if I were to believe the demo on TV looking out through a rainy windshield — would improve my ability to see the road in all kinds of inclement weather.

     So I ordered them over the phone (probably from an outfit in Florida ), and they arrived ten days later. Advertised as “easy to install,” I finally had to pay a not-too-cheap price to have them put on my car.

     And WERE they a whole lot better than the wipers that had been replaced? Heck no!!!!

 

     For many years, I resisted the temptation to buy another gadget from a TV ad. But then, five or six or seven years ago (time gets away from me), on some commercial after the 10 O’Clock News was over, I found myself irresistibly drawn to the “Gator Grip.” (Probably also from an outfit in Florida !)

     This thing is a type of socket wrench that has a head with little knobs that adjust around any size of bolt head or nut. Or so the ad copy said. “You’ll only need one wrench and THIS is it!!!”

     That sounded good to someone like me who does not have a practiced eye in picking out the correct size socket like you mechanical types out there. I wouldn’t have to try on a half-dozen or more sockets to find the right one!

     I was SO thrilled when I took it to unscrew a couple of bolts on the irrigation pump. But would it fit into a tight place? No! Could I position it under the intake hose and get it to ratchet? No! Was it any good at getting a good “Gator” grip on a single nut in the pumphouse? No!

     Was it useful for putting the legs on our new sofa? No! Was it handy when loosening the brackets on the truck topper? No! Has it ever worked well for any of the tasks I’ve used it for? Not really.

     So why… why… why do I optimistically think of using it every time I have a chore that involves a wrench?

     Is there anyone out there in horseland, or “equineland” if you prefer, who still uses the terms “near side” and “far side” on a regular basis? Or are those terms old-fashioned and easing away from our regular usage. I have a mule with a lameness problem in his off hock. My vet knows which hock I referred to, but when he digitally x-rayed the joint, the image was stored on the computer under “Right” side.

     We frequently observe that there are horse people who mix up the meaning of “by” and “out of,” and use “out of” when referring to the stallion. However, these two terms are pretty clear when one simply adds “sired” to “by,” and then thinks logically that “out of” refers to the dam.

     I was recently trying to figure out where the term “get” comes from when referring to the offspring of a horse. It means “something begotten,” from the verb “beget.” My Webster’s also adds: “the entire progeny of a male animal; lineage.” This is another older term that some people still use today, and some do not.

     I hope you get out to enjoy the warmer spring weather. I know I’ve got plenty of horse chores… equine chores… starting with cleaning my saddles, tack and saddle blankets!

Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Back to Articles Page

 

 

Rocky Mountain Rider Magazine • Montana Owned & Operated 
PO Box 995 • Hamilton, MT 59840 • 888-747-1000  •  406-363-4085 • info@rockymountainrider.com