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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine • Since 1993
Idaho • Montana • Nevada • Oregon • Utah • Washington • Wyoming

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1595 N First St

Hamilton, MT 59840

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Hamilton MT 59840

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Regional, Monthly All-Breed Horse Magazine
Distributed throughout the Greater Rockies Since 1993

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Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Letter from Reader

In Praise of Hackamores

Submitted by Harold Wadley, St. Maries , ID

 

April 2010 Issue

 

     I sure enjoy Heather Thomas’s articles. Thanks for carrying them. I read the part on cold, frozen bits (Feb. 2010), and that is one of the big reasons I only use my home-made hackamores!

     Even then, on minus degree days, I ride with a shield of wool fabric that hangs down and covers the nostrils. I usually cut a piece of fabric from a wool pant leg for this. Have you ever seen frozen blood icicles hanging from a horse’s nostrils?

     I just lost my old pal of 28 years and never had a bit in his mouth! I read that some bit warmers these days use electricity! I was raised working teams of mules and horses long before the rural electric reached us. My grandpa and dad always gave each animal a big handful of grain with some sorghum molasses in it, let them chew to the slobber point and then bridle them so they had a lot of warm buffer around the iron. They never used stainless steel! I think the horses’ memory of “I love the grain & molasses” seemed to offset what dislike they might have felt for the bit.

     When it was really cold, even the mule teams were worked with a sliding bosal instead of a bit, as a mule pays more attention to its nose than its mouth. Ours were worked both ways and always with that wool nose shield, but then we worked them all year and depended on them for a living. How times have changed!

 

Copyright 2010 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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Rocky Mountain Rider Magazine • Montana Owned & Operated 
PO Box 995 • Hamilton, MT 59840 • 888-747-1000  •  406-363-4085 • info@rockymountainrider.com