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Copyright 2008 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

Twenty Feet of Security  

By Victor T. Anderson, Estes Park, CO  

 

June 2008 Issue                                                                                                    Print this article

 

     One of the things I try to have in my saddle bags is a length of quarter-inch nylon rope. I like it to be around twenty feet or more in length, but even when a bit shorter it has proven to be invaluable on many occasions.

     Iíve spent much of my life as a ranch hand and big game guide. The last few years Iíve worked on guest ranches and on cattle drives. Many of the people we put horseback have little or no experience with horses.

     Sometimes things get broken or forgotten. Having twenty feet of security in the form of a piece of nylon rope has sometimes allowed those people, and me on occasion, to finish the day in the saddle.

     Some of the things Iíve used it for include a breast collar, halter, or a war bridle. It has been a throat latch, pigginí string, and bedroll rope. On occasion it has replaced a badly broken rein, and has been tied between a couple of trees to form a high line. It provided me a way to show kids how to throw a lariat or twirl a rope.

     The rope has held a tarp between two trees to serve as a tent, and more than once used as a guy rope on a tent. It has tied broken fence wire together, and been used like a block and tackle to close a gate, or as a substitute for a missing gate loop.

     While hunting or guiding it has been utilized to anchor the harvested animal to a tree to keep it from sliding downhill while I removed the offal. Afterward it served to pull the game to the pickup.

     A client once used it as a rifle sling when the hardware on his sling broke, and it has been a crupper when a saddle had a tendency to slide ahead.

     It has tied I donít know how many things to a saddle.

     Iím sure there are other ways to use it. But whatever they may be, unless the rope is with you, it is of no help.

 

     ó Ride Easy Pard. Vic Anderson, 2021 Fish Creek Road, Estes Park, CO. 80517;  970-214-5020. www.vicandersonyodelingcowboy.com.

Copyright 2008 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

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